A Casio in Iraq

Casio IraqOk, not technically a synth, but check this out. It’s a Casio AT-40 with Arabic labels spotted in Iraq of all places. Via Daniel: “A casio AT-40 with arabic lettering that I spotted in Hewler/Arbil in northern Iraq in december last year. I should have bought it!” Yeah he should have. : ) Click here for the full sized shot. It does make me wonder how much, if any, electronic music is being made in Iraq. I seem to vaguely remember there being an online music site from the country. If you know of any, please do comment. I ran a quick search and I did find one artist that goes by “phreaque modi” in Baghdad. Click here for the site with full tracks. It’s inspirational to think music like this is making its way through a situation like that.

TB-303 Cake

A TB-303 Birthday

Check out this TB-303 Birthday cake, also from Daniel.

“When I turned 30 one of my friends gave me this utterly nerdy cake. The colours look a bit funny but it really was gray at first. The knobs were eatable too!”

Very nice. I suddenly want a life sized Matrix-12 birthday cake.

Click here for a full sized shot. It kind of reminds me of a giant techno bling napoleon.

The Kawai SX-240


The Kawai SX-240 is a two DCO analog poly synth from the mid 80s. Video via jexus of syntezatory.prv.pl. Be sure to check out the rest of his videos if you like this one.

Howard Jones Retro

Two performances of Howard Jones live at his 20th Anniversery Concert at the Shepherds Bush Empire. What is obviously great about this performance is the vintage analog gear. These videos are are actually great showcases of the synths as much as the songs themselves.

Dr. Who

And finally I’ll just leave you with a collage of Dr. Who inspired videos.

Music Arcade – Radiophonic Workshop 3

Doctor Who – Corners 1987

YouTube via Tardisrules

all doctor who intro – collage of Dr. Who Intros

KLF – Dr. Who

Ok, that last video was probably stretching it a bit, but… Have a great weekend folks!

As always, for daily synth-related posts check out Matrixsynth.

  • http://www.createdigitalmusic.com Peter Kirn

    Synths are fairly popular in the Arabic world because they can easily adapt to maqams (Arabic modes). Keyboard just ran a good piece on this; I meant to link it here originally but thought I'd follow up with software solutions as well as hardware. The story on Abe Diab is there, with some tips on playing Arabic tunings.

    That said, no idea if this is just a stock Casio or not.

    Someone else could probably offer insight into the musical situation in Iraq. Music goes on even in times of war, of course. And we occasionally get Iraqi domains in referrer logs.