Yuri’s Night 2007 makes your head go all Sputink-y. Credit: Scott Beale / Laughing Squid.

Synths and space: they go together like chocolate and your mouth, like Sun Ra and aliens. So, it was with a heavy heart that I had to report the electronic awesomeness of Yuri’s Night, the party in celebration of space exploration at NASA’s Ames Research Center. Telefon Tel Aviv, Plaid, and circuit-bent Touch & Tells and keytars were there, but I was not. And maybe neither were you.

 NASA Yuri’s Night Rave: Space is the Place

Enough of that, though. Organized Matt Ganucheau writes to say this year will be bigger, better, “twice the art and twice the music.” 2008 will make 2007 look like a side party at Burning Man. So, in the interest of making sure your calendar is marked and your project is submitted, here’s a call for works — and hope to see you there.

What is Yuri’s Night?

Yuri’s Night World Space Parties celebrate humankind’s first venture into space by Russian Cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin on
April 12, 1961, and the launch of the first Space Shuttle on April 12, 1981. The event is a unique convergence of artists,
scientists, astronauts, performers, technologists, and musicians to pay tribute to our shared global heritage in space
exploration. Through simultaneous celebrations worldwide, Yuri’s Night is a collaboration of creative thinkers from all
fields to ignite excitement about what is new on the horizon in space exploration and to remind us of the inspiring
possibilities that humanity can achieve. In 2008, NASA’s 50th Anniversary, the NASA Ames Research Center will host the
largest Yuri’s Night event ever held.

We invite artists and scientists to investigate and demonstrate our culture’s radical new technology, art and
vision for sustaining our future.

We’re looking for visionaries of the sciences and arts to join our celebration: artists who love science, scientists who love
art, and those who blur the line between all disciplines. Exhibit or demonstrate your works in the spacious NASA hangars
or adjoining tarmac and structures.

Yuri’s Night Bay Area 2008 will be held in two large hangars, totaling 80,000 square feet and extending over 400,000
square feet on the adjoining open tarmac. The rare access to expansive combined indoor and outdoor spaces
encourages large-scale installations and the potential for unusual works and performances showcased on the adjoining
tarmac. The main music stage will be at the far end of the tarmac, leaving the largest hangar exclusively for installations,
performances and demonstrations.

This is an exciting opportunity for unique collaboration between the science world and the art world. We encourage
partnerships between scientific and artistic minds and may be able to assist in partnering.

What we are looking for:

New installations of all sizes and types, interactive works, sound works, light works, large-scale sculpture, live
demonstrations, working models, table top demonstrations, prototypes, new technology, presentations, impromptu
lectures, and unique performances from international and local artists. We are also seeking new video works
documenting arts, humanities, performances, installations and microgravity works.

We encourage all applicants to think of ways to make their projects more ecologically friendly and sustainable. This may
include the use of recycled or reused materials, the incorporation of renewable power sources, demonstrations of green
technology, or just a plan for transporting the project that reduces gasoline use. Please let us know in your application if
your project has been planned or will be presented with any such features.

Full submission guidelines and details here:

2008 Call for Artists [PDF]

  • The Dalai Sputnik

    I have GOT to get me one of those hats!

    Love to all Earthlings,

    The Dalai Sputnik

  • http://www.groundreport.com/davemartial223 Winston Rott

    I admit, I have not been on this webpage in a long time… however it was another joy to see It is such an important topic and ignored by so many, even professionals. I thank you to help making people more aware of possible issues.Great stuff as usual Such an attitude is somewhat elitist, as if serving these more abstract regions were somehow of greater value to mankind then service to the humanities, the non-technical expression of the rest of man's nature.