UFO, Black Hawk War from CandyStations on Vimeo.

Jaymis Loveday sits down with Deborah Johnson for Create Digital Motion in a conversation about live visuals for music. Deborah (right), aka CandyStation, is touring with Sufjan Stevens, another of our favorite musicians. (If I could come up with more excuses to bring him into a "digital music" blog, I would.)

It really is a conversation, as Jaymis has plenty of thoughts himself, having toured with Australian Idol Bobby Flynn (and I think the two are kindred in aesthetic).

See Deborah’s visuals above, and check out the full interview on CDMotion:

Interview: Deborah Johnson on Sufjan, Singer Songwriters, and Content

Many artists tour with visuals, but use canned material. Seen any particularly terrific shows with live visuals lately? (Maybe someday we’ll be able to get together a matchmaking service for Create Digital Musicians and Create Digital Motionists — speaking as someone who does do both, it’s not always easy to split energies, and collaboration is more fun!)

  • http://myspace.com/oldmonkeymusic deb

    2 words:

    raster-noton

    or is that one word?

    anyhoo—always amazing (and loud) and funkay.

  • Max Cascone

    The legendary arena-jam band Phish didn't use video or graphics but the moving/intelligent lights were a key element to their live shows. The light designer, Chris Kuroda, was considered by many to be the fifth member of the band, and had as much to do as anybody with the overall feeling and vibe of a given moment during a show. He toured with the band for twenty years, improvising the light moves and patterns along with the band every night, and his cues became an integral part of the show for people who saw them many times. On one of the band's final tours, in Vegas, he was not able to be with them and Dave Matthews's light guy filled in for him. He wasn't bad technically, but he didn't know the songs inside and out like Kuroda (and everyone else in the arena), and the long-time fans were so accustomed to his style and habits that it lent a very strange, unfamiliar feeling to the shows.

  • http://www.sinch.net Dan

    I'm in a band called Sinch. We've been doing live visuals since 2000. One of the members of the band plays the Viditar which is made by Livid Instruments (he's also the founder/owner of the company).

  • http://myspace.com/tictacshutup Tic-Tac Shut Up

    The last bright eyes tour had really interesting visuals. The entire stage/band was dressed in white and live visuals were made by mixing ink and other objects in water and then projecting it toward the stage (in addition to video clips). I had a hard time finding a live link, but here's a music video featuring the idea:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ns6YKipCfUU

    Kicks in at about 3:17.