Don’t toss that Windows Mobile gadget yet. In fact, you might want to keep glued to Craig’s List for a used unit, if you like the idea of road warrior music production on the cheap, sans laptop.

Amidst all the hype around the iPhone and iPod Touch, Windows Mobile devices could actually win on power apps for on-the-go music making. Maybe that’s because of the similarity to developing Windows desktop apps, maybe it’s because of fewer restrictions compared to Apple’s SDK, or maybe some combination of that and fortune. Nonetheless, during this Summer of iPhone, the makers of powerful Windows Mobile sequencer/sampler studio Griff note on their new blog that Windows Mobile just got a new music app.

Yes, you read that right: a new app for Windows Mobile.

Wildly enough, MeTeoR is basically a pocket-able miniature DAW, boasting:

  • 12 tracks of audio with stereo mixdown
  • Audio waveform editing with cut, copy, paste, and processing (fade, normalize, reverse, etc.)
  • Various effects (delay, chorus, reverb, phaser, filters, pitch shift, noise gate, graphic EQ, and more), with routable aux sends
  • Metronome with live recording
  • A mixer with full automation envelopes for each tracks (for the mixer lanes and effects)

The whole thing is basically reminiscent of an old version of Cakewalk for Windows, only running in your pocket. I could see it as fairly useful for doing some quick processing or pre-processing on a big project – load those extra files on the subway and keep working on that project, even if you’re up against a deadline.

Not only that, but because the system requirements are fairly flexible and used Windows Mobile devices are fairly worthless, you could easily rescue someone’s unused PDA and press it into service as a music device. They’ll thank you. The environment will thank you.

US$29.95, but unlike Apple’s iTunes store, you can download a demo version. (Imagine that.)

All of this is on paper (erm, pixels); no promises, as I haven’t used it yet. I have to brush off my Dell PDA and give this a try. I know there’s a charger here somewhere…

MeTeoR @ 4pockets.com [Demo download and purchase links, detailed features]

  • Benjo

    When i think of making music i think of using a musical instrument first and a mobile device last. When i want to go mobile i'll take my iPhone first, instruments next, plane tickets, etc. Never, ever, a Windows device for serious music!

  • Ivan

    There is Bhajis Loops for Palm PDAs too

  • http://i--x.net vvvoid

    <q cite="Benjo">When i think of making music i think of using a musical instrument first and a mobile device last. When i want to go mobile i’ll take my iPhone first, instruments next, plane tickets, etc. Never, ever, a Windows device for serious music!</q>

    So, when you think of making music, mobile, you take your mobile phone first. Great.

  • http://www.createdigitalmusic.com Peter Kirn

    @Ivan, absolutely, Bhajis is fantastic. I was just surprised to see what seems to be a *new* app for Windows Mobile of this sort, though it's possible Griff were mistaken and this has been around longer than we thought (first I've seen it, at least).

  • Vulp

    "When i think of making music i think of using a musical instrument first and a mobile device last. When i want to go mobile i’ll take my iPhone first, instruments next, plane tickets, etc. Never, ever, a Windows device for serious music!"

    So basically "I hate Windows". Congratulations.

  • Misha

    Does anybody have particular recommendations for a suitable (non-phone) device that could be used for this specific audio application? Peter mentioned a Dell PDA…any other models?

    Thanks!

  • Julio

    I have the same question as Misha. If I were looking at trying the Griff software. What would be a good choice of phone. The Samsung Blackjack runs Windows Mobile doesn't it? I was going to get one of those anyway. That would be sweet.

  • Malachi

    It's always funny to see people going on about what is required for "serious" music making. Considering people made astounding music with stellar production on equipment that is today considered archaic and useless, while others use high tech devices and make crap.

    Anyways, I downloaded the demo, but it seems to be only a sequencer, meaning no synths. Good if you have to make a quick demo on the run, but so far I see no point for myself. We'll see. I did find on the same site an app called Audio Box, which is more of a softstudio featuring a variety of synth modules with extensive editing options. Saving is disabled on the demo, so no examples, but so far it works quite well. Might have to buy that one.

    Griff was the reason I bought a PDA in the first place. Was I ever disappointed. So much promise brought low by a simple oversight in the GUI; in order to access different octaves or continue plotting notes beyond the first bar you have to scrunch the screen up, making everything smaller and harder to see and manage. A simple scroll bar would have fixed everything, but according to Griff's makers there would be no more updates as they considered the software finished. Especially bad as the OS had updated since Griff was made. That was a few years back, though, maybe they've done more.

    As for devices, I've had an Asus MyPal A730 for about 3 years now and I still think it's great.

  • gordon

    Serious music eh. too be honest when i hear someone say this i am astounded. Surely a good musician remains open minded. When the electric bass first came out it was met with suspicion, but modern music would not be the same today. Bob Dylan was critized for going electric etc. surely pushing the boundaries and experimentation is the lifeblood of music in fact of all creative endeavours. yes once Apple was the undisputed king of music, windows is now a completely valid and cheaper (hardware) alternative which many musicians embrace because it give them an opportunity to make music that the expense of apple may deny them otherwize. at the end of the day they are all just tools in the same way an instrument is, and the quality of the finished product is down to the user. many people slag budget guitars, but someone like Eric Claptonwould still sound good on a pawn shop guitar. i think that those who cling to the imagined superiority of their equipment are basically insecure of their ability and essentially hiding behind it.

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