People still find heroes – imperfect as they may be, people who provide inspiration. I’ve been talking a lot this year about the impact of Max Mathews; more on that soon. But in the aftermath of Steve Jobs’ death, it’s touching to see some of the reactions. French Rock band Bravery in Battle write CDM to share their music video homage to the Apple leader. They’ve gotten quite a lot of attention in French, as well (French-language links):

«Ayez faim, soyez fous»… les bonnes paroles de Steve jobs mises en musique [Liberation]
Un bel hommage à Steve Jobs en musique (vidéo) [stevejobs.fr]

We are Bravery in Battle, a French rock band. When we heard of Steve Jobs’s death, on October the 5th, we decided at once to write some music to pay him homage.
We have been using the Mac to make music for almost 15 years now and it’s completely part of our creative process. We also have been using
the iPad on stage since the very first days of its launching to trigger samples and play instruments too cumbersome to carry.
Without Apple and its products, we wouldn’t the artists we are today.
But we didn’t want to write a song, we wanted to use Steve’s very words and hear his own voice. That’s why we used his memorable 2005 Stanford Commencement Address. We have chosen the words which seemed the most meaningful for us and for the occasion.
As an additional homage, we played all the music on an iPad, with GarageBand : a Steve Jobs Tribute using only his devices and softwares.
To make a video; we used the same Stanford Address (made on a Mac, too, with Final Cut Pro X).
The original speech was very widely consulted on the Net in the hours following Steve Jobs’s death but our video tells something else. It focuses on a single point and increases its emotion.
For Bravery in Battle
Paul Malinowski

  • vincent

    so so damn cheesy

  • OMG

    UGH ! NO…

  • http://noisepages.com/members/papernoise/ Hanzo

    hmm.

  • http://music.cornwarning.com chaircrusher

    KILL ME NOW

  • Jengel

    Cheez aside, I do think they did a good job of turning his words into melody. I've seen a lot of algorithms try to turn words to melody, but the human touch makes it a lot more artistic, less literal.

  • icarus

    i agree with jengel. it's a genuine artistic gesture, quite different from the other Jobs tributes you can find on the internet, using Autotune or craps like that. 

    There's a thin line between emotion and cheese and IMO the definition of cheese is quite personal. Personally, I find this video quite moving.