Music Synthesis with a Human Pulse: Max/MSP and Biofeedback

While on the subject of physical computing, you can’t get much more physical than the pulse from a human body. pixelcrypt has created a piece that synthesizes music using human pulse. Two participants can collaborate on the music by regulating their pulse; the sonic feedback means this interactive art piece also doubles as an excellent example of biofeedback. Working together, you can synchronize your pulses. (I dream of the day when I can receive MIDI Time Code, but until then . . .) Bio Rhythms v1 Evaluation (via SteamSHIFT) The whole thing is built in Max/MSP: plug in a sensor, …

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Everyone Deserves a Robotic MIDI Arm — Even DJs

Okay, wannabe cyborgs, you know you want it: no matter the price, you have to have a robotic armature on your body that sends MIDI data. The latest, via Engadget: the Gypsy MIDI controller. (Wait a second, the gypsy MIDI controller? Now, that doesn’t sound very cyborg. Marketing department, please?) It’ll cost you US$855 an arm, or US$1,675 for the whole suit (best value, as the marketing people would say). Sound pricey? No, that’s about typical in the history of these kind of mechanisms. Speaking of which, despite their claims, this is not the first device of this kind. But …

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Circuit-bent Lightbulb Music at Tokyo Dorkbot; Tokyo Writer Wanted!

If you missed the evolving Dorkbot event in May, you missed some fantastic flourescent light bulb performance and djing with human bodies as electrical swithces. (The former I’ve heard done by a different artist; beautiful, wild sounds.) You’ve got a second chance: Dorkbot is due again on the 2nd of October with bending circuits apparently the theme: Dorkbot Tokyo Taking Off [English, WWMNA] May Dorkbot coverage in Japanese: RealTokyo, RadioLife May Dorkbot summary in English: Dorkbot.org, plus photos Upcoming Event info [Japanese only, but hey, it is in Tokyo] Tokyo correspondent wanted! Readers in Tokyo, want to keep us posted …

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Body Pads: Play Your Thighs [Updated]

Using piezo-electric sensors or specialized drum pads, you can turn acoustic drums into triggers, then convert that signal to MIDI. But why stop there, when your legs are just waiting to be slapped? To use your legs as a trigger, you’ll want a fairly sensitive sensor — standard drum triggers would require you to hit your legs with your sticks. Hard. (Though you might be into that; I don’t know.) The Pulse BD-1 Body Pad Drum Trigger is supposedly designed just for the purpose of strapping a trigger to your body. They’re ugly as hell (check the geeky product shots). …

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