Creative, Networked Music Making on $100 One Laptop Per Child

Negroponte’s $100 One Laptop Per Child will include creative music making tools for children. Our friend Nathanael Lecaude writes us: Just wanted to let you know what I was working on during the summer, we’re doing a sequencer/algorithmic music generator for the OLPC project. We did all the protoyping in Max and are now porting it to Python/GTK using Csound as the sound engine. TamTam, music app on the OLPC Wiki TamTam is intended both as an instrument in itself and an environment for learning music. It has basic sequencing and synthesis capabilities, presented in a child-friendly format. It’s also …

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ccCreators: New Community for Creative People to Meet, Collaborate

Going beyond the mix tape now, here’s a new community for creative types to meet up and collaborate, all while sharing work under a Creative Commons license, as created by Marco Raaphorst of Melodiefabriek: Any Creative Commons creator can join for free. So if you’re a composer, a filmmaker, a podcaster, a writer, you name it, please join! As far as I know this is the first community which is so broadly oriented and Creative Commons based. Sure, I love to talk with other composers and remixers about music, but wouldn’t it also be nice to communicate directly with the …

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CDM Forums: Discover New Music, Share Your Work, and Find Collaborators

By popular request, we’ve launched a new forum for Create Digital Music (and, soon, Create Digital Motion): Share Your Work – CDM Forums If you want to hear fellow CDM readers’ music, share your own, show off your crazy new interactive installation or VJ reel, look for collaborators to work on a song or to replace the bass player in your band, this is the place. And, since I just put it up last night without telling anyone, it’s quite pristine at the moment, so go do your worst. For now, this forum is wide-open; eventually we hope to split …

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Music Synthesis with a Human Pulse: Max/MSP and Biofeedback

While on the subject of physical computing, you can’t get much more physical than the pulse from a human body. pixelcrypt has created a piece that synthesizes music using human pulse. Two participants can collaborate on the music by regulating their pulse; the sonic feedback means this interactive art piece also doubles as an excellent example of biofeedback. Working together, you can synchronize your pulses. (I dream of the day when I can receive MIDI Time Code, but until then . . .) Bio Rhythms v1 Evaluation (via SteamSHIFT) The whole thing is built in Max/MSP: plug in a sensor, …

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London Synthesis Orchestra: All-Synth Ensemble Playing

Here’s an instrumentation for the analog lover: a room full of modular analog synths and analog keyboards, packed with classics from Moog, Yamaha, Roland, and Korg. Composer Matt Hodson writes to tell us about his “London Synthesis Orchestra,” an ensemble filled entirely with synths: My latest project … ‘the London Synthesis Orchestra’. Based on using scores influenced by Cage and I-ching I am exploring and diverging into the ‘sound object’ using nothing but synthesis and un-conventional scoring schemes… not to mention my Orchestra. Classic improvisational techniques from these composers do seem well-suited to the medium; could more synth ensembles be …

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Use for Skype Voice Conference: Band Practice

From the Share Skype site comes an interesting application of voice conferencing: getting your band together. As a background, our band Liquid Playground is reuniting and performing for our 10 year college reunion at Princeton in May, but the problem is we haven’t seen or played with each other for 7 years. time heals most wounds and we are all happy to get back together for a reunion gig. Here is how we set it up: Three of us were in my garage in Redwood City, CA (drums, vocals, keyboards), the bass player was in Colorado, and the guitar player …

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How to Start a Nintendo DS ElecktroPlankton Band

Yet more Nintendo music-making — this time with the strange and fascinating ElectroPlankton music game for the Nintendo DS. Thomas at MileZero has started a tutorial on starting a “one-man band” using ElectroPlankton: Part one: introduction and why he did it Part two: Working with Luminaria (don’t ask; think you have to try it!) If anyone is going to make music with game systems, this is really the way to do it. Like the music software homebrewers have created for the original Game Boy, ElectroPlankton is really tailored to the game hardware on which it runs. And it offers something …

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Digitalmusician.net Goes Public: Online Music Collaboration

Real-time audio and MIDI collaboration, Mac and PC, video chat, exchanging big files, Web space — we all know what the wish list of features would look like for online musical collaboration. Back in April, Digitalmusician.net promised these features, with a public launch planned for August. Unfortunately, that beta was massively crowded, so many of you who tried to get on may have been thwarted. Well, guess what? It’s August, and Digitalmusician.net has delivered on schedule. Standard accounts are free, with support for online studio sessions without charge. Steinberg, Native Instruments, and Ableton are partners, too — good sign. (VST …

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Hypersense Complex: Gestural Gloves for Music

Flex sensors are fab: these cheap strips send varying voltages when you bend them, seen in use in projects like Eric Singer’s sonic banana (basically, a bendable tube for triggering sounds). The trick is turning that flex data into something useful. Hypersense Complex is a three-person collaborative working on new musical interfaces, and they’ve been nice enough to post details of the hardware and software they’re using. Hardware — all cheap, off-the-shelf stuff you can play with, too. Software — they’re doing fancy Python script interpretation to turn gestures into music in the free sound app SuperCollider. Check out details, …

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