Your Demoscene Moment: Organic Geometries, Acoustic Sounds, Beating Heart

Ah, so it turns out that demoscene animations don’t all have to feature bad trance music. (Sorry, had to be said.) Srdce is simply exquisite, fluid animations of blades of grass, waveform vibrations, geometric tangles, and the exploding fragments of a beating heart set to a touching song. It came in second at the Outline 2014 demoparty. Trans-cultural bonus: you get a (Slovak or Czech?) rendition of Emily Dickinson. “Srdce” means heart in Czech; the team originates from Slovakia. With beautiful instrumentation (banjo!), it’s a lovely way to spend two minutes. And all of this fits in 8MB of Windows …

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akira^8GB-on-PT1210

Amiga is Back: DJing with Two CDJ-Style “Turntables” will Amaze Your Friends

Eat your heart out, Traktor. Take that, CDJs. The dream of the 90s is alive, again, with new Amiga software. Akira Kei shares the project, which he and hoffman co-created and have dubbed the PT-1210 MK1. It mimics some CDJ-style features, but uses MOD files – a clever music format that employs samples and sequence data for truly portable, interactive music. This isn’t just a nerdy hack. It’s actually a full-blown DJ tool that could make its way through a party – provided that party’s musical tastes trended slightly retro. And since it runs on stock Amiga machines, you might …

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Interlude: Press This Button, Make it the 90s [Amiga]

Worsened by the iPhone 5 launch, I realize we’ve had an enormous run of all-Apple stories on the site recently. So, in the interest of keeping platform fights to a minimum, I think it’s only fair to give some space to the other creative platform, beginning with the letter A. Amiga. What else? (Oh, and Atari, I’ll get to you soon.) One floppy disk. One incredibly efficiently-coded demo. Result: it’s the 90s all over again. Thanks, Rutger. (Muller, not Hauer; the Dutch artist makes some great retro-tilted music of his own.) Back to our regularly-scheduled programming.

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One Line of Code, into Music: Now with Visuals

This update I believe is worth a second post, as it makes visible the otherwise-mysterious algorithms producing music in our previous post. And yes, I believe this is “music,” naysayers aside. Whether it’s good music is in the ears of the listener, but if you can describe this much sound with this little code, imagine what’s really possible in computer music. Whatever it is you want to hear, it’s within the power of your imagination to describe it, on a score or in code, either one. Thanks to none other than Stephan Schmitt for the tip.

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Glitchy Imagery, Made from a Single Line of C, Inspired by Algorithmic Music

On Create Digital Music today, we cover stunningly-complex, if aesthetically very digital, compositions compacted into single lines of C code: Entire Musical Compositions Made from Just One Line of Code are Glitchy but Musical It’s in the grand tradition of communities like the demoscene, but features algorithmic invention that has lots of people excited. Friend-of-the-site and Brooklyn-based artist Kyle McDonald naturally takes up the gauntlet to translate the same ideas into imagery, and what we’re left with is an optical artefact (artifice?) of the same idea. The images are quite gorgeous; see above, and the video that inspired them below: …

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Entire Musical Compositions Made from Just One Line of Code are Glitchy but Musical

You know you’re in for something different with an article that contains this line: “as 256 bytes is becoming the new 4K, there has been ever more need to play decent music in the 256-byte size class. ” In just a single line of code, Finnish artist and coder countercomplex, working with other contributors, is creating “bitwise creations in a pre-apocalyptic world.” What’s stunning is to listen to the results, even if you have trouble following the code – the results are complex and organic, glitchy but with compositional direction, as though the machine itself had learned to compose in …

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Simple Xmp Modplayer for Android Brings Retro Back; Building an Android Tracker?

Those crazy Amiga artists were ahead of their time. The lightweight real-time music engines and formats they began were uncommonly efficient, and allowed the exchange of elaborate electronic music using a minimum of resources – with some accompanying compositional and sound design ingenuity required, as well. As a result, getting a phone handset to reproduce their work today is a pretty manageable task, and some of the music available is concise and clever. Pop on some headphones, load up some tunes, and you may feel you’re starring in your very own Amiga point and click adventure the next time you …

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Demoscene Meets Microsoft Excel 2003

Via Justin Day (co-founder of Blip.tv) comes proof that, provided some scripting tools, even Microsoft Excel 2003 can be an animation program. No strange software choice shall be left unturned by the demo community. The Braadworsten brigade presents: Exelence (a demo made in MS Excel 2003) This one is released at Breakpoint 2009 and is 90% on-party coded/created. Bonus points: it uses Renoise, now my favorite tracker for music, because who says a tracker shouldn’t have modern functionality? More info at: http://www.scene.org/ – yes, scene as in “Demo”

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Linger In Shadows: Demoscene Makes it to the PlayStation 3

I first saw Linger in Shadows on the Playstation Store Dashboard – the poster image was intriguing, and the game itself is only $2.99. Curious, I clicked through for more information… Holy crap. It’s Interactive Art. On my Playstation. The developers are Plastic, a Demoscene group from Poland. Gamespot UK reported on it earlier this year, writing that Sony actually approached these folks and got them hooked up with PS3 dev kits. Looking to the product itself, I’ve found it to be visually engaging, as well as a bit confusing. Instructions are eschewed in favor of simple icons and a …

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Toolbox: Mac App is Like a Modular, Generative Photoshop

Vectors. Generative vectors. Text, as made in Toolbox, by the software’s creator Simon Strandgaard. Something’s happening in software. Generative techniques have been around about as long as computers, but from Spore‘s game design, soundtrack and creature editors to new music software like Nodal and Noatikl, in 2008 we’re seeing those techniques more accessible than ever. Good news for fans of the demoscene (an underground movement melding coding and art): it’s back with a vengeance, now interconnected with the larger Web and friendlier software-making tools. It’s only a public alpha, but Toolbox, bargain-priced at 20 Euros (EUR50 when released), suggests what …

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