YouTube Adds Online Video Editing As You Upload; Great for Quick Demo Reels

Upload, edit – the two are back together again on YouTube. Google Operating System was sharp enough to notice the change. (Thanks, Lifehacker) Aside from the player interface, the whole interface makes use of HTML5, though it’s not as sophisticated as a former Flash-based “remix” tool that YouTube offered, then discontinued. (That seems to be the nature of the design of the tool more than the comparative functionality of Flash and browsers.) What’s nice is that videos in your account appear automatically, ready to drag, trip, and compose. You can add audio from YouTube’s AudioSwap service, with accompanying advertising, though …

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Wave Editor Competition Lives, with WaveLab 7 for PC … and Mac

Let’s get this out of the way right at the beginning: dedicated audio editors are important. For sound design, for tweaking audio assets, and for just getting close to your sounds, editing waveforms in a DAW often doesn’t cut it. That’s made a lot of Mac users unhappy, because it’s one of the few areas where the Mac platform lags seriously behind Windows in available choice. Windows users have been spoiled by choices like Sound Forge (now Sony), Adobe Audition, and Steinberg WaveLab, all three excellent editors that are functional and fast to work with. The Mac, meanwhile, has been …

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Testing Notebook: Want to Help Us with Linux Video Editors (or Just Follow Along)?

Photo (CC-BY-ND) Matt McGee. Video editing on Linux can work — I’ve seen some terrific stuff. The trick is figuring out the proper configuration. Before you say, “ah, yes, you’ve just terrified me into never touching Linux again” — this post isn’t for you. For you, the idea is for us to research some of the optimal configurations and then share the knowledge so you can get video editing on a laptop with little or no pain. So, forget you read this. Move along. Seriously, go do something else; pick up your camcorder and find something pretty to shoot or …

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Crowd-Produced Concert Video: Nine Inch Nails' "The Gift" from Lights In The Sky Tour

One Frame Of Fame shows us how a band can use viral culture and crowdsourcing to grab some publicity and make a couple of thousand people “stars” of a music video. But what could you achieve if you already have a surfeit of fans? For a couple of years, Trent Reznor and the Nine Inch Nails’ crew have been exploring new ways of releasing music and interacting with fans: Getting them to create visuals for their Ghosts release, having art director Rob Sheridan shoot video on stage with his DSLR, creating innovative, interactive concert visuals, and sharing insights on how …

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Eclectic Method ACID + Vegas Visual Beatmapping, Remixing How-to

One of the things I admire about audiovisual duo Eclectic Method is the way they work with audiovisual materials, slicing and mapping visual materials as though they’re sonic loops, all within the rhythmic grid. They’re also, as visualists go, able to carry a party on their own in a way that’s truly rare. So even as I hope that the term “visualist” will come to mean far more than the audiovisual cut-up and a video translation of what VJs (and DJs) have been, there’s no less to learn from Eclectic Method. They also do things with Sony’s software that’s utterly …

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Melodyne Automagic Pitch-Changing Direct Note Access is Here, in Beta

The wait is over – and rumors that Melodyne’s bleeding-edge technologies to allow direct access to notes in polyphonic audio had failed to come to fruition turn out to be false. (I was skeptical about those rumors in April.) Melodyne DNA did take longer than expected to ship, but then, that isn’t exactly news in the software business. And now you can try this “note access” concept for yourself and see what you think (well, provided you’re an existing customer). Coupled with time-based manipulation of audio in the form of updated tools in Ableton Live 8, Cakewalk SONAR 8.5, Propellerhead …

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DAW Day – SONAR 8.5 Production Tastiness, and the Smooth 64-bit Transition

SONAR’s AudioSnap now has cleaner markers, and an understandable interface – and does quite a few things Logic 9’s new Flex Time does not. SONAR 8.5, I’m sure at some point, was to be SONAR 9. There’s an enormous amount of functionality in this release. But I think the surprise is some of the stuff that won’t necessarily appeal to the widest audio production audience. Here’s a DAW that’s adding unusual new features for arranging tracks, putting an integrated arpeggiator on every track, beefing up its step sequencer (really), and dumping a bunch of class LinnDrum samples into the package. …

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FL Studio 9 Arrives: Better Performance, More Toys, More Editing

Click through for FL’s infamous Giant Screenshot of FL 9. See, it’ll look perfect on your 40″ flat screen. Update: Despite discussion in comments, Image-Line assures us this is an image of FL9. We’ll have more shots once we try out the software, of course! “Fruity Loops” has long proven that not all music making apps have to look the same way. FL is quirky and different. Its editing interface is built as much around step sequencers and pattern sequencing as the conventional, mixer and audio-tape-derived views. But perhaps some of its real draw is that it packs, in its …

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Pro Tools Bundles: $99-129, Hardware for Vocals, Recording, Keys

For people looking to get into music recording and production on a computer, for the first time, there’s a bundle that says “Pro Tools” on the box that costs correction: as little as just $99. It really is Pro Tools software; it’s certainly streamlined (some basic track limits, no multitrack recording), but still with a serious complement of recording, mixing, and effects, and even some nice virtual instruments. Beyond that, your choice is which hardware you’d like in your “value meal”: For vocalists: The Vocal Studio has a cardoid condenser mic – that’s a USB mic you can connect directly …

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