Beyond NAMM: LA Friday Night Party, Music Tech Panel – It’s Gonna Be The Future Soon

Photo courtesy Droid Behavior from a previous year. In Anaheim this week, the music manufacturer trade gather to show their wares. But 8pm – 4am Friday night, we party. “Wham Bam Thank You NAMM” has become an annual tradition, an unofficial afterparty of sorts for the first two days of the trade show. This year’s lineup: John Tejada, Richard Devine, Flashbulb, Deru, Laura Escude, Scott Pagano, CPU, DJ Kero, Acid Circus, Derek Michael, Baseck, Eezir, Trifonic, DJ G Ov, Moldover, Henry Strange, and myself, among others. Escaping from the Anaheim Convention Center doldrums, the event is held in the lovely, …

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Virtual Radios Made from Paper, RFID

Digital technology has transformed the listening experience. But there’s little in the way of physical artifacts of that act, and a diminished sense of humanized relationships to an individual being at the other end. From modern radio to Internet-streamed playlists, our listening world is DJed by automated robots in streams that flow through generic, mass-market speakers. The object and the content lack the design intention that imbued, for instance, the gorgeous radio sets of the early 20th Century and the personalities that narrated the programming. Armed with a lasercutter, designer Matt Brown has a novel concept for how to redesign …

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Operator-1 Details: The Casio VL-Tone of the 21st Century, Plus the Synth Alarm Clock!

For lovers of the simplicity and fun of the Casio VL series, a successor seems is finally here. The Operator-1 (OP-1), even in prototype form, has us hot and bothered more than anything we’ve seen recently. We’ve been able to snag some additional details. MusicRadar got a video with the creators, though you won’t learn anything new from that. In the interview, Teenage Electronics are just as tight-lipped as they were on the website, and the video “demo” is basically watching the OLED screen light up inside a glass case, with no sound – the prototype just isn’t ready to …

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Strap on Gloves, Play Two-Handed Spatial Theremin

Based on work with the Oblong g-speak “spatial operating environment” gestural system – research that inspired the film Minority Report – our friend Trey Harrison has been doing some wonderful work with new Theremin-style interfaces. He writes: I have been working with Oblong Industries (http://oblong.com) and took some of my spare time to combine their technology with my Salvation project (http://slvtn.com) and build a theremin-like instrument. There are three degrees of control: Pitch is adjusted by moving hands left and right. Volume is adjusted by moving hands up and down. Vibrato is adjusted by moving hands foward and backward. Many …

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Roll Your Own Multitouch Screens, Tables: Max Multitouch Framework, PyMT

c Ever feel like you’ve found the seam dividing past and future? The past: restrictive UI frameworks requiring pages and pages of code to produce dated-look 2D displays. Proprietary software with rigid interfaces. Input bottlenecked through the x and y coordinates of a single mouse pointer. The future: UIs whipped together graphically or with a few lines of code. 3D mixed with 2D. Open-source, friendly frameworks. Creating your own interface or drawing upon a community of creative software makers. Input that uses multitouch for gestures, collaborative input, manipulation of 2D and 3D space, and … well, just a lot more …

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Futurism and Sphere Fetish: Microsoft Channels Woody Allen; Let’s Play Music with Spheres

I actually hadn’t had time to watch my tech RSS feeds yesterday when I said I “lost half an hour dreaming of my new lounge-style studio where I adjust envelope breakpoints from a giant aluminum sphere like the one in Sleeper.” But, anyway – wish granted! *Disclaimer: The following video, while demonstrating some insanely cool tech, may bore you to tears. In response to reader requests, we feel it’s important to warn you. Microsoft’s multi-touch Sphere plays crazy Pong [Boing Boing Gadgets] Now, of course, researchers being researchers, Microsoft R&D has taken a massive sphere controller and turned it into …

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Goodies from Networked Music Review Research Blog

Turbulence, the net art folks, have launched a “research blog” for music technology. Don’t let the “research” part put you off: it has pictures. And ring tones featuring pig sounds. (Hint to researchers: turn off the pig ring tone when you’re in the library.) There’s also a feature article from March with Jason Freeman, talking about projects from iTunes Signature Makers to audience-interactive musical compositions. Networked Music Review, the new sibling to our long-time favorite Networked Performance blog Calling things “research blogs” is catching on in many circles, and why not? The Internet’s hyperlinked universe and Google’s interconnected search algorithm …

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