control-android

On Android, Free, Open Source Touch Control for Music – And It’s Just the Beginning

If you’re looking to turn an Android phone or flashy, new Android tablet into a touch controller for music, you’ll be really glad to see OSC and MIDI controller Control. Furthermore, here’s a solid, powerful app based on the Web that lets Apple and Android fans play well together. I’ve sung the praises of Control’s philosophy before. Templates are built on Web/HTML5 (WebKit) rendering, not proprietary, inflexible interface widgets, and can be created in JSON. You can make templates dynamic, too, because of everything JavaScript does. (Non-jargon-filled translation: you can use the goodness of the Web to make control layouts …

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3D Meets Open Video: HTML5 + NVIDIA + WebM + Firefox

Got this hardware? Then watch YouTube go into 3D. All you need is to get a friend to toss some fish from behind your monitor to complete the effect. (See: Muppets Take Manhattan.) The promise of genuinely open video isn’t just making something “open” for the sake of it. Realizing that potential means doing something you might not otherwise. In the midst of all this griping about Flash and codecs, you’d want Web video to actually do something it hadn’t done before. It’s just a step, but here’s one possibility: Mozilla today announced a collaboration with NVIDIA to add stereoscopic …

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Miro 4 Media Tool Promises the Quality of Closed, Only It's Open; Could Be HTML5 Dream Utility

Miro 4, an open source video player, has long been promising at least on paper as a means of sharing and watching open video. But the delivery in early versions was shaky, suffering from stability issues in some cases and simply failing to provide a compelling use case in others – particularly with browsers and other media players. Miro 4 is largely about music, but that in itself is relevant to video producers. If Miro can be a compelling iTunes alternative – particularly on the Mac, where such choices are few – it could be an intriguing distribution outlet for …

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Miro 4 Media Tool Promises the Quality of Closed, Only It’s Open; Could Be HTML5 Dream Utility

Miro 4, an open source video player, has long been promising at least on paper as a means of sharing and watching open video. But the delivery in early versions was shaky, suffering from stability issues in some cases and simply failing to provide a compelling use case in others – particularly with browsers and other media players. Miro 4 is largely about music, but that in itself is relevant to video producers. If Miro can be a compelling iTunes alternative – particularly on the Mac, where such choices are few – it could be an intriguing distribution outlet for …

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More WebGL Fun: Use Shaders in a Browser, Play a Game with Fireflies

If your WebGL appetite still wants more 3D goodness in your browser, here are two additional examples since last week’s story. Via Tiago, Shadertoy is an in-browser renderer that allows you to edit shader code in GLSL (the basic language of an OpenGL GPU) and render it in-browser. The only bad news is that this project from 2009 may not have kept up with rapidly-changing browser specs; for me, 2D shaders worked perfectly on an NVIDIA 320M, but not anything 3D, in either Chrome or Firefox. But some of you know much more about this than I do, so have …

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WebGL in Chrome, Experiments Shows OpenGL in the Browser; What It Is, What It's Not

Mmmmmm … multi-dimensional. Photo (CC-BY) fdecomite Attention, 3D fans: OpenGL in the browser has gradually gotten real. WebGL is a browser-friendly API for OpenGL graphics, and it’s pretty darned close to OpenGL ES 2.0, which in turn will be familiar to anyone doing modern mobile 3D development. WebGL isn’t part of HTML5, but HTML5 makes it possible: the Canvas element is what allows WebGL to work its magic. And WebGL goes nicely with technologies that are part of HTML5 or modern browser experiments, including the web audio API and browser video support. (The superb 20 Things I Learned About Browsers …

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WebGL in Chrome, Experiments Shows OpenGL in the Browser; What It Is, What It’s Not

Mmmmmm … multi-dimensional. Photo (CC-BY) fdecomite Attention, 3D fans: OpenGL in the browser has gradually gotten real. WebGL is a browser-friendly API for OpenGL graphics, and it’s pretty darned close to OpenGL ES 2.0, which in turn will be familiar to anyone doing modern mobile 3D development. WebGL isn’t part of HTML5, but HTML5 makes it possible: the Canvas element is what allows WebGL to work its magic. And WebGL goes nicely with technologies that are part of HTML5 or modern browser experiments, including the web audio API and browser video support. (The superb 20 Things I Learned About Browsers …

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Music Made with NYC Subway Schedules; HTML5+Flash, Q+A with Artist-Developer

Alexander Chen transforms the steady pulse of the (actual) New York City subway system into gentle, generative string plucks in his new interactive piece “Conductor.” The visual effect as well as the musical one is mesmerizing, as the subway is viewed in the abstract, sparse geometries of designed Massimo Vignelli’s 1972 diagram. New York subway nerds and long-time residents will note that the schedule itself is from 1972, hence the appearance of the K train and the elevated along Third Avenue (the 8), one I imagine we wish we still had. http://mta.me/ The work is also a glimpse of the …

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Music Control Meets Web Code Goodness: App for iOS, Soon OSC+MIDI Everywhere?

Music notation is powerful because it’s a standard. You can share it between musicians and understand what it means. What if, instead of being confined to individual, platform-specific apps, digital controls for music were the same way? We’re not just talking a MIDI message here or there, either – someone could walk in with some new-fangled noisemaker they just build in hardware or software, and all you’d need to talk to it and change its sound would be a Web browser. At first glance, the generically-titled “Control” seems like just another iPhone / iPad touchscreen controller, in an already-crowded field. …

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Google Hands Open Video a Huge Win, as Misconceptions Persist

Google ups the ante. H.264, it’s on. Of course, given the entrenchment of existing videos and the Flash plug-in, many are predicting the “die tryin’” scenario is the more likely one. Time will tell. Photo (CC-BY) Linus Bohman. Today, Google announced it is omitting H.264 support from its Chrome browser, in favor of free and patent-unencumbered VP8 (via the WebM container) and OGG Theora codecs. Simply put, it’s the biggest victory the open video camp has gotten in a landscape that has largely seemed tilted against them. The long-term outcome is, fairly, anyone’s guess. But you can at least mark …

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