Android Music, Swedish Musical Good Times, Stockholm Wednesday

It’s a week of mobile geekery and music as I travel to Stockholm. I’m speaking at the Android Only developer conference; I’m excited that there’s discussion not only of Android development per se, but also networking, the open-source CouchDB database (which itself has some promise for music projects), cross-platform development in JavaScript and dynamic languages, audio development, 2D acceleration, and more. Fans of Pd and/or RjDj also have plenty to anticipate; the creators of this interactive music tool for mobiles have been hard at work, and there’s good stuff happening on both Android and iOS. I’m looking forward to meeting …

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Unity Game Engine 3 Adds Real-time Audio, Mod Tracker Features

Nearing the release of Unity 3, the popular multi-platform game engine, the dev team offers thoughts on what excites them most in the upgrade. Amongst those features are some tasty introductions in sound. Real-time audio features could make Unity an appealing environment for people working on experimental 3D interfaces for sound or adding more interactive sonic and music elements to games. And a MOD tracker … well, if you have to ask, you probably don’t care, but some heart rates in a particular community just shot way up. From the blog: Samantha Kalman I’m most thrilled about the new audio …

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Tim Exile Starts Video Blog, Makes Beatbox Light Art with Reaktor

Tim Exile, talented musician, Reaktor guru, and mad genius of interactive live performance, has started a video blog. It’s tough to describe what’s covered in the video, other than to say Tim is starting more or less an open house in his brain, which can only lead to good things. He talks live, music making, and his current plans, including a tasty-sounding open studio series in London. And through the whole thing, he has a Lite-Brite-style visualization he programmed in Reaktor, well beyond what I’ve ever been able to make Reaktor do. It’s clearly more Tim talking directly to fans …

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Kids Making Music: Interactive Music Box Draws Experience from Games

Ten minutes. Four or five kids (or adults). Make a song. Go. That’s the idea behind the Youth Music Box, developed by Silent Studios and Chris O’Shea. (Our friend Chris you may recall from various interactive projects and the blog pixelsumo; he sends this project our way.) The software is build in openFrameworks, the C++-based creative coding environment for artists. With keys, drums, and yes, even a scratching DJ-style interface, the music box brings together kids for quick music making, inspired by the phenomenon of musical games. The experience is guided by genre, with some effort to make sure whatever …

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Game Music Inspiration: Amon Tobin and Sony on Infamous

Wired has a great mini-documentary on the score for the videogame Infamous. It’s chock full of sound design ear candy, not only served by the chops of composer Amon Tobin but the team at Sony Music and Sony’s entertainment division, as well. Curiously, Jonathan Mayer, Music Manager at SCEA, says explicitly that he doesn’t want composers writing interactive music. He’d prefer to have them write a conventional score and then adapt it to the interactive engine. Now, of course, around these parts we like the idea of composers finding ways to write genuinely generative and interactive scores. But in this …

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Monolake Interactive Music for Jet Lag: Installed Max/MSP Audio, Free MP3 Download

Eno had Music for Airports. It’s fitting that Monolake would do Music for Jet Lag. Robert Henke writes about this month’s free download: Since I also have been flying a lot recently, I named it after one of the most annoying side effects of modern transportation and mixed it in a way that reflects that dizzy feeling of being hyper active and totally asleep at the same time. ( "Last call for mister Robert Henke, flying to Berlin, please come to gate B 154 IMMEDIATELY or we will unload your luggage !!!!!!!!!" ) I am myself recovering from jetlag on …

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GDC: Music, Games, Interactivity Pt. II, Plus Embarrassing Dance Footage

In the thrilling conclusion of our chat with Boing Boing’s Xeni Jardin, Matt Ganucheau and I explore deep thoughts about the roles of interactivity and adaptivity in music and game design — then attempt to dance in giants Katamari Damacy hats. (Note the use of the word attempt — those things were more than a bit tricky to move in. Hilarity ensues.) Prior to leading a dance dance Revolución, we talk a bit about the ways in which game design relate to gesture in musical interface and how musical scores could become non-linear. The gesture issue really goes well beyond …

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AudioMulch 2.0 Revealed: Mac + Windows, The Next Patching Generation

AudioMulch isn’t just a sequel or a new episode. This is AudioMulch: The Next Generation. We have holodecks in this one. That’s the claim of the developer, anyway, and looking at the features, I have to agree. AudioMulch has long been a cult favorite for people wanting to patch together unusual sonic tools and performance rigs. That puts it in a category with apps like Reaktor or Max/MSP, but unlike those tools, AudioMulch has a lot of stuff built for you already. Those buildings blocks also have an idiosyncratic personality of their own, but remain flexible enough that you can …

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Code Your Own Sequencer? Archaeopteryx Generates MIDI with Ruby

Archaeopteryx: Ruby Self-Generating Pattern Sequencer from giles goat boy on Vimeo. Who needs NAMM? Well, sure, you could wait 48 hours for the mind-bogglingly awesome announcements I’m sure we’ll be scooping on this site know absolutely nothing about. But that’s 48 hours you could be spending right now, coding your own sequencer. And unless Ableton and Steinberg and Apple and Digidesign and all are reading your thoughts, it may just do something they haven’t imagined yet. Ah, you say, but wouldn’t that mean learning something ancient and arcane like C? No, I’d say. You can do it Ruby, and impress …

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