Send Audio Via Network: Wormhole2 (Mac/Win)

Wormhole2 is a plug-in that lets you route audio via a network, between any computers you’ve got handy (Mac or PC). You could save processing power by letting different machines handle CPU-intense effects and instruments, or share audio onstage. (You’ll need to send sync separately.) It gets cooler, especially with new features added to version 2: Automatic configuration Easy routing and option configuration, via a gorgeous interface by CDM reader Atariboy Low-latency, and automatic latency compensation for round-trip audio VST (Mac/Win) and Audio Unit (Mac), US$49.95. By the way, if you remember this as an apulSoft app, you may have …

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Send Audio Via Network: Jack (Open Source/Free) + Tiger

Deja vu, anyone? The same day that plasq has released their solution for sending audio over a network, Wormhole2, the new Tiger-ready version of Jack is out. Unlike Wormhole, Jack is Open Source, though it’s also Mac- (and Linux-) only; no Windows. Mac users, you don’t have to choose between the two: Jack is great for connecting audio apps to one another, not just computers, so you might use Jack for inter-app audio and Wormhole2 for network audio, if, like me, you’ve got a PC around, too. Jack developer Dan Nigrin writes that the new Jack is “compatible with Tiger, …

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Musikmesse: Collaborate Online with Digitalmusician.net

Now in public beta (form required) but launching in August, Digitalmusician.net is an ambitious one-stop-shop for online collaboration. No, it's not just new-fangled live collaboration; it's the whole package: Interactive VST collaboration: Send audio and MIDI via a VST 2.0 plugin live to and from anywhere, with high-quality audio (256 kb MP3 max, stereo), on both Mac and PC. Sample-accurate timing. (How they've pulled this off, we have no idea!) Video conferencing: Video chat with your collaborator. "Give tips, advice, and coach your partner" they say — as in "dude, you're dragging, and your bass playing sucks!"? Personal homepage / …

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More Unreal “Game” Performances

Reader Andrew Barton sends us details of his own video/audio performances making use of the Unreal game engine: check out the Son of Science ensemble and Floating Point performance. Floating point lets 'players' move around game objects to produce sound. (Boy, I'd really like to see this with the physics in Half-Life 2.) How can you get in on the action? Check out: UT 2004 Mod Author support site Unreal Developer Network Let us know what you're doing! (See our previous report)

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Linux for Music: Studio to Go! Interview

Linux for music is everywhere, from the power behind the Korg Oasys to new, more usable Linux desktop music software. CDM got a chance to talk to Chris Cannam of Fervent Software, developers of the Linux-based Studio-to-Go. Chris tells us a bit more about Studio-to-Go, as well as more generally the past, present, and future of Linux music-making — as well as some ideas about how you might actually use this stuff. I've been running Studio to Go! on my Pentium M laptop, and after having struggled with previous Linux builds to get a studio up and running, I can …

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