Re-imagining Pirate Radio Broadcasting with P2P

P2P Radio from robertanderson on Vimeo. Could meshes of data help the creation of new, international radio broadcasting and receiving mechanisms – even in rural areas? Artist Juan Esteban Rios proposes a design to do that. It’s not just a software concept; a hardware design would make the idea accessible even to people who don’t own or know how to use computers. It seems a powerful idea for musicians, as well, particularly if it helped eliminate the need for dedicated streaming servers. (There may be others who are more familiar with P2P broadcasting technology out there; if so, I’d love …

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Reminder: HOPE “We Are Hacks” A/V Event Tonight; Listen to HOPE Online

Tonight, musical and visual artists converge for an evening of live performance at the HOPE hacker conference in NYC, 11p – 2a. Hope you can make it there, New York area peoples. There are other ways of joining the event (and the rest of the HOPE conference): IRC Channel — irc.oceanius.com #radiostatler And for live radio, which should (technicalities notwithstanding) broadcast CDM’s performance: http://radio.hope.net/listen.php More on the event: CDM event details and preview Facebook page

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Lala, Free Music Streaming, And Why Two-Tier Pricing is the Future

It’s clear that the new world of music listening involves more — more music, listening in more places, with more styles of music from more places in the world. So, naturally, it makes sense that we won’t pay per-album fees for everything we hear; even if you were addicted to your indie college radio station 20 years ago, that’s the case. (And I’ll be you didn’t buy everything you heard, though you probably bought some of it.) The question is, how to model those costs, so the people making and distributing the music make money. Make whatever argument you like …

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Weekend Inspiration: Party with Experimental Sound Like It’s Montreal 1967

Simon James writes with still more free sound — and free, indeed, as Montreal Expo in 1967 (the World’s Fair) brought together some of electronic sound’s most radical musicians, the type of gang who could freak out a crowd today as much as forty years ago. Thanks again for the mention of Tone Generation. I just thought I’d draw your attention to another related piece I produced with Ian Helliwell last year. It was called ‘Expo 67 – A Radiophonic collage’ and was a snapshot in sound of the Montreal worlds fair in 1967. Tristram Cary composed music for the …

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Zoom H4 Mobile Recorder, In Action on NPR

Brad Linder, a freelance journalist, shared his Zoom H4 mobile battery pack hack at a recent coworking event in Brooklyn called Jelly. The idea of coworking is to get “virtual” electronic workers out of their apartments and in an environment where they can meet other people. “Lonely” I think is the wrong word, as many of us have chosen that life, but at the same time we’re aware of missing some of the potential of real-world interaction. As it happens, just that power of random happenstance has me collaborating with an industrial designer on a custom Monome, and picking up …

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I Wish You Ran the Record Industry Lobbying Efforts; Beware the Pencil

If the readers here did, I suspect musicians and record labels would be richer, not poorer, music would be spread further around the planet, and policy might actually make sense. If you haven’t yet read comments on last week’s analysis of an industry push for DRM on radio, do it now. On second though, as many artists start their own labels or self-publish, we may not be far from a world in which the artists really do run the record industry. Imagine an industry that’s actually smart and has a sense of humor. Fascinating. AudioLemon, author of one of the …

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Radio DRM: Irrelevant, Untimely, Wrong, Says Digital Freedom Campaign

As noted last night — with some very witty responses from incredulous readers — the record industry is now pushing for DRM on all radio. It’s a bad idea to begin with, and they’re bringing it up in a context in which it doesn’t even belond, negotiations on royalty rates, at a bad time — in the midst of negotiations that have broken down. I’d love to stop covering this issue, but the most recent round is too absurd to pass up. (Feel free to spread the word, since Congress demonstrated that, at least on a basic level, they’re listening …

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Record Industry Now Completely Bonkers, Wants DRM on All Radio

Deep in Tesla’s labs, Mark Twain discovers the awesome, destructive force of Windows Sound Recorder. Be afeared, intellectual property owners!) Act now, fellow musicians — before Sound Recorder destroys music! It’s amazing how complete and total crazies can suddenly wind up with the backing of organizations powerful enough to dictate the law. Witness the strange story of the “stream-ripping” scare, and how it somehow led to a push for mandatory, proprietary DRM on all Internet radio. Gasp as the experience of bringing back Mark Twain’s ghost somehow inspires a company you’ve never heard of to build their own DRM for …

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Internet Radio Wins Temporary Delay, Possible Minimum Rate Break

This may stretch your definition of “good news” for webcasters, but the latest on the Internet Radio crisis runs something like this: Webcasters don’t yet have to pay new fees for their broadcast. But they’re still accruing debt — fast. Sort of like our credit card debt. Webcasters may get a small break on the minimum fee, one that could literally have shut down “personalized” radio services. SoundExchange explains the deal thusly: Under the new proposal, to be implemented by remand to the CRJs, SoundExchange has offered to cap the $500 per channel minimum fee at $50,000 per year for …

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The Day the Music Died, Otherwise Known As The Dawning Era of Negotiations

Several readers have observed this quite eloquently, but let’s summarize: laws around music are complicated, messy, and confusing. If they don’t seem that way to you, you’re either a lawyer or you haven’t done your homework. That said, without question, proposed changes to streaming music licensing fees would be devastating to Internet radio, because not just top 40 music requires license fees — even many indie labels are RIAA members and participate in SoundExchange. But here’s the key: they’d be devastating as proposed. And suddenly, at the eleventh hour, SoundExchange seems to be backpedaling. (Their strategy, evidently: push as hard …

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