scratchmarkup

Proposal: A Markup Language for Turntable Scratch Performance; Open Call

Scratching, captured. Photo (CC-BY-SA) karl sinfield / sindesign. Add this to the Internet of Things: imagine data recording scratching and scratch performances. Technologists Jamie Wilkinson, Michael Auger, and Kyle McDonald propose a new way of storing scratch moves as data. They’re not just working in traditional ways, either: they’re hacking turntables and optical mice and cameras, and imagine not only recording performances, but having machines recreate scratching. (Robots!) And they want your help. Kyle writes: i’m going to be leading a group at art hack day ( brooklyn, january 26th-28th www.arthackday.net/ ) about scratch markup language, a tool for recording …

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Augmented Reality DJ: Scratch it with a Camera, Plus AR Resources

AR scratching from vanderlin on Vimeo. “Augmented Reality” is a fancy term for describing ways of using computer vision to overlay digital intelligence on images. In other words, you can, for instance, scratch a vinyl record using a camera – plus a tag for identifying the object’s position in 3D space. Cambridge-based designer Todd Vanderlin put together an elegant demonstration of the possibilities here, and his video has accordingly been making the rounds. (See: Synthtopia – and I actually heard about it this morning from a high school friend. The power of the Internet.) Todd has more details on his …

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Ableton Live 8 Misuse: Ping Pong Psuedo Scratching Effect Video Tutorial

For all the emphasis on learning how to use creative tools the proper way, it’s often when you misuse a feature that it really becomes a powerful tool. So, in the spirit of some of the “mistutorials” from Ableton’s own Dennis DeSantis, here’s our friend Michael Hatsis of New York’s Track Team Audio / Warper Party / Dubspot with a really unusual way to achieve scratching effects. You know the Ping Pong effect for its clichéd, stereo-panning echo effects. But here, it goes an entirely different direction: now that Live 8 has added new delay modes, you can create some …

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Fretless Fader DJ Video: Slide the Crossfader, Slide the Pitch

Ted Pallas sends along this terrific video of a hacked hardware crossfader, created by John Beez, that slides up and down on rails. Slide the crossfader itself vertically, and you change the pitch. It’s always fascinating to see this kind of solution — a bit like the keyboards that added pitch bend by letting you move the keys in latitudinal motion. And, for a little extra something, he adds a talkbox, too. The only problem with the talkbox: a tube in your mouth is not the world’s most flattering physical interface. From the description: This is the first public view …

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A Dreamy Prototype for Ableton Live Control Finally Mimics UI

Ableton Live controllers are suddenly everywhere, in commercial products and DIY creations. But an in-progress prototype being designed by Serbia-based creator Sasa Djuric, found on the CDM Flickr pool, goes the extra distance to integrate more effectively with the software. The hardware looks more like the on-screen UI, for starters – an elusive objective for many controllers. And by working with the Mackie Control protocol, Sasa is able to make communication between hardware and software fully bi-directional, so the controller gives you essential feedback. There’s even a facility for scratching. The design is based on the popular MIDIbox platform. Sasa …

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NAMM: NI Traktor Scratch, Audio 8 DJ, You Know, for Turntablists

Traktor + vinyl + audio interface = Traktor Scratch. And while NAMM is cluttered with new DJ gear, this one deserves special attention. The audio interface alone may be worth a look, whatever system you use. Months after they cut the cord with long-time partner Stanton and Final Scratch, Native Instruments is not surprisingly back with their own vinyl control solution, Traktor Scratch, and a new audio interface, the Audio 8 DJ. Here’s the basic specs on the system, and our take on the whole system — including why we’re eager to test it:

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