Renoise Tracker Made Into Animation

While on the subject of hacking animation into music tools and audiovisual performance, here’s about as far out as you can get: What you’re seeing is actually the user interface for Renoise, an app in a category of music tools called “trackers”, being animated directly. The little characters you’re seeing light up are events in the sequence, so as the sequence plays, so does the animation. (What you’re hearing as the musical background in the video is essentially unrelated, I’m guessing, but it’s nonetheless a wild idea.) Seems a fitting way to celebrate the latest upgrade to Renoise and its …

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Ableton for the DVJ: Users Hack in Scratching, Live Video, and Visual Remixing

Live brushes up its VJ kung fu: The Karate Kid live remix at the CDM NAMM Party last month, as Ableton Live gets integrated into live visuals. Photo courtesy Robin Hunicke. Audiovisual performance has a history stretching back through the decades — from the 90s Japan audiovisual scene to 60s Acid Tests and whole heck of a lot of other places. Heck, I’m fairly certain people were shooting up on morphine or getting happy with the opium and chilling out to magic lanterns and colored lights at the end of the 19th Century. But there’s a new excitement brewing globally …

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Artist Profiles: Monolake in New Zealand

Window is a lovely arts blog — across “writers, academics, engineers — anyone with a good idea” — out of Aukland, New Zealand. They have a good overview of Monolake, aka Robert Henke, electronic composer and musician and co-founder of Ableton. Monolake/Robert Henke 2008 And you know what that means. Time for some video action. The first is by Lars Nagler, from his track “Layering Buddha”, which is based on Buddha Machines (you know, instead of albums entirely featuring the Tenori-On or KAOSSilator). The second is Robert showing off his Monodeck, which while not entirely practical in some ways still …

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Ableton Live Does Frame-By-Frame Animation

Squarely in the “things Ableton Live was not necessarily built to do”: animating visuals, one frame at a time. Cousin Throckmorton whipped up a retro visual feast of Space Invaders, Pong, and other games classics, using MIDI to step through frames individually. You can MIDI sequence Live’s locators to jump between frames, thereby giving the effect of animation. Sprites/frames are drawn using blank MIDI clips; unfortunately, the resolution is limited by the Y-axis size, as Live doesn’t allow you to resize that. Live’s skins are somewhat tied to MIDI already, so you can “ride” the skins field to change background …

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Remixing Karate Kid Live: The Real Power of 3-Way MIDI Sync

Karate Kid AV Remix from momo_the_monster on Vimeo. A major highlight of the party CDM held last weekend with our friends at TRASH_AUDIO and VJKungFu.tv: a live remix of The Karate Kid. Momo the Monster mangled the video while Shane Hazelton and Stephan Vankov did music. The whole event was powered by some clever MIDI sync that managed to wrangle the gear — enough hardware that it seemed like the crew had just raided a Guitar Center — and sync up the video. Sure, the remix may sound silly — and it was. (Deliciously so.) But the interplay between the …

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NAMM: Unofficial CDM Afterparty, Live in LA, Friday Night

Friday we’re pleased to co-host a party with trash_audio and vjkungfu.tv in Mid-City Los Angeles. If you’re in LA or visiting NAMM in Anaheim, you won’t want to miss this – Richard Devine headlining, terrific music and live visuals, and workshops. If you don’t know the other two sites, by the way, trash_audio (featuring Richard, Justin, and Deep Element) is a fantastic blog that regularly profiles creative workspaces for music. vjkungfu.tv, helmed by VJ momo the monster, has in-depth video tutorials for live visualists; we hope to feature it more on createdigitalmotion.com in the near future. Here’s the lineup: 1. …

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Sound in Motion: Sound Design in Chicago, Jan 15-21

Any CDM readers who live in Chicago should check this out- it’s a weeklong festival exploring/celebrating sound design, motion graphics, and the overlapping regions occupied by both. In addition to the week’s worth of discussions and skillsharing classes, there will be two “showcase” nights, Saturday Jan. 19th and Sunday Jan. 20th. For those interested, I will be exhibiting two audiosculptural pieces, Octophonopod and Snowy Day during the event on Saturday. There’s a riduculous amount of talent on both nights, amounting to some of the most fresh and innovative people working in sound and motion graphics today. [- Michael Una]

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Block Rocking Blocks: Latest in Visualism from Create Digital Motion

Digitalists can’t be satisfied with the aural alone, so for visuals, here’s the latest from CDMusic’s sister site: UnitedVisualArtists blow us away with more elegant digital art, including the new generative visuals seen above for Chemical Brothers. Jaymis has good times experimenting with slow motion on his new Sony camera; now gorgeous motion from butterflies is the domain of consumers as well as big-budget nature programs. And in other news: top-shelf hard drive RAIDs, our own Jitterist vade talks about his work, remembering Doc Bailey’s spectacular work, what’s new (or isn’t all that new) in Jitter for Max 5, I …

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Second-Ever NES Cartridge Music Album

The sounds are lush and silky smooth, like a cello making love to an angel. The new, enhanced graphics are … breathtaking, in their spectacular range of colors and pixels. Yes, folks, it’s time for another multimedia extravaganza, as released on NES cartridge. This stuff is what we like to call “high fidelity.” It’s the medium of the future, man. Keep your new-fangled laserdiscs and enhanced multimedia CDs, and behold! Alex Mauer tips us off with inside information on the work of … Alex Mauer. Alex Mauer, creator of the first Nintendo cart music album, has already come out with …

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Flickr Screen Grabs: Infinite Video Theremin, Odd, Free Musical Interfaces

Tommy responds to our call for screen grabs of software with this fascinating Jitter patch: He writes: used lloopp and jitter runtime to make this instrument that uses a firewire camera as a source for effecting sound generators. i like this shot because of the video feedback. What’s lloopp? Glad you asked. It’s a live improvisation / looping / performance tool built in Max/MSP and totally open source. That makes it ideally-suited to use if you’ve found other live performance tools to be overly restrictive on their own. lloopp Speaking of free, unusual interfaces, Tommy also sends along this elegant …

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