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Take Ableton sets Back to the Future with a time machine effect

It’s the future – this time, for real. Yes, today, the 21st of October 2015, is the destination “future” in the Back to the Future movies. (Photoshopping created some false alarms on other dates.) And that’s time to look back. Ha, remember 1985? An arcane format called “MIDI” was king. (Kids, ask your parents.) The big synthesizers came from Roland, KORG, Moog, and Yamaha. The most sought-after computer was from a company called Apple. People made electro and dance music hits using mono, analog synthesizers and and digital pads and samples and deep basslines, sought after the creations of the …

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Watch The Retro-Fabulous, Colorful Real-time Freakouts of Robotkid

Robotkid, aka Josh Randall, is the veteran former Creative Director at Harmonix who regularly infused VJ and real-time visual aesthetics into the company’s games (Beatles Rock Band, VibRibbon, etc.). Now, he’s gone to LA, where his passion for the most fantastically colorful trips of the past is feeding new visual fancies. And they’re too good not to share. Where better to start than with a full-on freak-out on Disneyland’s Space Mountain, here seeming more futuristic than ever:

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From Hacked VHS and CCTV Tech, An Installation That Reverses Your Sight

Parallax from Incredible Bob on Vimeo. At its best, art can change a perspective, or change the way you see. In the installation “Parallax” by our friend Incredible Bob, that’s meant literally – very literally. Using hacked viewfinders and analog video tech, the Belgrade-based artist shows the viewer what happens when the perspective of your eyes is reversed – without the screaming, bleeding, and vision loss that might otherwise risk. He writes: Parallax is a binocular video installation made out of two hacked VHS viewfinders crossed with 2 CCTV bullet cameras. When you look at it, your eyes become crossed, …

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Daft Presets? Reason 7 Effect is Instagram for Music; How to Use – or Misuse It – and Why [Video]

Propellerhead’s latest cheeky tutorial makes no apologies. Reason 7’s Audiomatic Retro Transformer is, they say, the equivalent of tapping a filter on a phone camera app like Instagram, bundling lots of different sound attributes together into a single push-button setting. Ironically, their example is a send-up of the distinctive sound of Daft Punk’s poppy, fuzzy disco – meaning, they’ve got a preset for the band that says the problem with computers is presets. (And to think, you didn’t need to pay for all that high-end studio time.) This seems likely to produce some controversy. In fact, I’d for some time …

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CREATED: Call it VHSwave — Jacob 2-2, Stephen Farris and Music That Looks Back Through Time

Futuristic technologies, now found … in the past. Maybe that explains the sound of a lot of new music, says CDM contributor Matt Earp. Photo (CC-BY-NC-SA) ReallyBoring. What happens as music peers through the gauze of memory? Our contributor Matt Earp asks that question with the second installment of the new series, CREATED, a column that examines new and undiscovered music and feeds our headphones through the week. There’s a production technique in a lot of today’s post-FlyLo, beat-driven instrumental hip-hop that’s pretty darn pervasive when you start listening out for it. It’s that woozy, wobbling 80s synth sound – …

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8-bit Visuals with Bit Shifter, flight404, noteNdo – Because Processing Can be Lo-Fi, Too

Bit Shifter & Flight404 • “Feedback” / “Flight Risk” from Bit Shifter on Vimeo. It’s not just sound going chip, lo-fi, retro. Live visuals are, too. With Jaymis at Brisbane’s Game On fest and New York’s chip blowout the Blip Festival coming up next week, it seems a perfect time to look at some inspired 8-bit visuals – call them, instead of chiptune, chipviz? Both are set to the wonderful sounds of Bit Shifter, a star of the 8-bit scene if ever there were one. flight404 aka Robert Hodgin is known for lush, digital videos, the very opposite of lo-fi. …

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Video History Lesson: Consumer Video and DRM at Dansdata

I think we’ve probably got a couple of years of tape-based video cameras left, but it’s starting to look like solid state is becoming a serious option for consumer use. So while we wait, Dansdata has a great history of home video, with a dose of DRM thrown in. Tivo is finally about to launch in Australia, which is great, though I’m happy with my XBox Media Centre. What are the web’s finest video geeks using for their media consumption?

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The Battle for Analog: VHS and the Evils of DVD

Sure, the name of the site may be Create Digital Motion, but don’t get me wrong — we know digital is evil. Or, specifically, digital gets real evil at certain times. There are the latency-inducing, problem-causing HDMI cables when VGA or S-Video or Composite would do the job, the “look at our brand, new storage format” trend that turns out to be “look at the hideously onerous, new copy protection method we’ve just invented.” We know a little bit of our soul died when we brought in all this digital tech to our work. (Happy side note, though: my eyes …

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Why I Want a Portable VHS Video Case, from Museum of Lost Interactions

It’s really a pity The Video Case is a tongue-in-cheek design project from the Museum of Lost Interactions and not a real product. Yes, I know, we’re supposed to laugh at how this not-actually-from-1979 design is so primitive compared to our fancy-schmancy video iPods. But consider the design achievements here: The rigid suitcase protects from shock, and conveys the sense of substantial equipment and physical attachment. The large form factor means a screen that’s actually watchable, and could be shared with others. Internal speakers create a fully-integrated multimedia experience, in contrast to the endless attachments portable media players require. Analog …

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Retro Ad: Portable Panasonic VCR, Future of Jazz Dance

In 1983, Panasonic presented a bold future of videography, one in which cameras adjusted exposure and focus all by themselves, and we would sling portable VCRs over our arm to film ourselves doing interpretive jazz dance as the sun set over the Pacific. We would have terrific legs and short shorts, and dance with the sheer exuberance auto-focus inspired … until we realized we neglected to move the tripod as the tide came in, and our expensive Panasonic gear floated out to sea. It’s nice to hear Panasonic’s old slogan “Just Slightly Ahead of Our Time” — an atypically pragmatic …

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