CoGe 1.0 Beta 2, Open Source Quartz Composer Modular Visual App

CoGe 1.0 Beta 2 Teaser and interactive Quad Warp demo from luma beamerz on Vimeo. CoGe 1.0 is now in its second public beta, bringing this modular, Quartz-Composer-based visualist app to Mac users. 1.0 introduced a new rendering pipeline, new user interface, new UI, and richer Quartz Composer support. Every single element of the visual app — the player, the effects, the mixer modules — is based on Quartz Composer. That means that you can open up any module you see onscreen, and see an accompanying, visual patch you can modify. It really makes for a complete modular experience. In …

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NodeBox 2: Free, Python-Powered Tool Gets Visual Patching, Windows Support

Free tools like Processing and OpenFrameworks have provided elegant, quick coding for live graphics, but their interfaces have tended to be code-based. One exception has been the Mac-based Field, which provides graphical patching. Now, you can add NodeBox to that list. This free graphical creation toolkit, built on Python, had long allowed tinkering with and exporting beautiful illustrations, but its interface used code exclusively – and it ran on Macs only. Now, NodeBox 2, in an actively-developed beta, runs on Windows and adds a graphical patching interface. The “Core Vector” Nodes act as much as a set of macros as …

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MetaSynth 5 is Here: Graphical Sound-as-Painting Tool, Overhauled

A refresh for an old friend. Click through for full-sized image. MetaSynth has long been something special, a rare tool beloved by sound designers and fans of unusual software for music. The creation of software designer Eric Wenger, creator of the 3D modeling tool Bryce, expressed his unique vision of how computer design could work for sound with interfaces to make synthesis, filtering, and effects more graphical. At the same time, you’d be forgiven for forgetting MetaSynth, as the independently-developed, Mac-only application has been out of the headlines a long time. Imagine my surprise to see Edward Spiegel’s announcement today …

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Music Sequencing as Bicycle Wheels, Rubik’s Cubes at Fest in Argentina

Performance with Cubie from sadmb on Vimeo. Music sequencing as a Rubik’s Cube-style game, or hypnotic, kinetic rotating wheels – your piano roll won’t know what hit it. New musical art is set to be performed in Argentina, but you can download both tools, free. Computer interfaces for music date back decades now, but with ingrained notions of hardware sound sequencers, linear media like tape, and hundreds of years of notation in staves and bars, old habits can be hard to kick. Yet it seems that suddenly, a younger generation of audiovisual composers is exploding notions of how musical interface …

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99 Bottles of LEDs on the Wall… Bottle-Drive Display Tech

Bottle wall (no sound) from Alex Beim on Vimeo. Organic LEDs? Interactive visual fabrics? Bah. The future is BOTTLES, man. Alex Beim sends along this lovely-looking display made from bottles illuminated by LED lights, which makes for the Official CDM Saturday Diversion Post. (Um… yeah, the first and last of those.) The real lesson: if you can shine light through it, you can do lovely stuff. Looks really purty. Thanks, Alex!

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mgfest Presentation: How Real-Time is Changing Visuals

We’ll Do it Live: How Real-Time is Changing Visuals View more presentations from peterkirn. (tags: motion graphics computer vision) Last Friday at MGFest Chicago, I gave a short talk on what real-time can mean for visuals. The crowd had a large contingent of traditional motion graphics designers – my own presentation was followed by a slick demo for using Cinema4D to do those flying logos you see so often – but folks did seem receptive to the idea that real-time visuals open up other possibilities. Above are some of the slides, which give you an idea of the talk. And, …

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Groovy Color TV Oscilloscope Box from Critter and Guitari

This isn’t your average oscilloscope. This is that buttoned-down lab equipment with the tie off, gone psychedelic. The Derraindrop is the latest strange hardware creation from the wizards at Critter and Guitari, the folks who brought us the brilliant DIY Video Critter custom video synth and other wonderful video creations. In an age when hardware has waned as video input, they’re keeping the dream alive. The Derraindrop is simple but brilliant: plug in an audio input, get oscilloscope output, but repainted into sweet, groovy color. Knobs adjust mode (both lines and filled areas are available), color, and gain. And the …

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Auditorium: Free Flash Music Game Creates Music with Streams of Particles

Auditorium is a fascinating free Flash game that turns interactive music arrangement into a series of puzzles. The center of the game is what the creators call “flow” – a visual stream of particles that can be directed to audio “containers” to create sound. The user places circles with icons signifying direction in the stream to redirect the particles where desired. As the stream hits the containers, it produces musical patterns. The results aren’t entirely open-ended – that is, there is a fairly fun puzzle game here, in that you can only “clear” a level by directing the flow of …

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Celebrating Timelapse: Timelapse Picks, Philosophy, and a Call for Works

Cranford Rose Garden Time-lapse at Brooklyn Botanic Garden from Brooklyn Botanic Garden on Vimeo. Whether at the scale of a frame, a tiny sample, or a period of days, digital is all about the manipulation of time. So it’s fitting that our friend Chris Jordan focuses in his work on the expressive potential of timelapse, and that he runs New York’s T-Minus, a festival devoted to timelapse. You’ve got some time to get in your submissions for this year’s T-Minus – the call for works follows – but I wanted to press Chris a bit on why manipulations of time …

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Video as Instrument: The Fairlight CMI’s Visualist Sibling, the Fairlight CVI

The Fairlight CMI, the ground-breaking digital synth created by Australians Peter Vogel and Kim Ryrie, is well known for its contribution to music. Think names like Peter Gabriel, Hans Zimmer, David Bowie, Herbie Hancock, Kate Bush, Bono, and … hang on, I’ll stop before this becomes a very long list. With tablet input and sophisticated sampling capabilities, the CMI holds up reasonably well against even modern tech, even if it cost as much as a luxury car. (See Keyboard Magazine‘s 2006 write-up.) But less known is the CMI’s influential visual sibling, the CVI — Computer Video Instrument. Introduced to the …

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